Don’t call me DOM

Home

8 September 2005

Worldclock with gdesklets

Filed under:

Working with people around the world, I often ask myself what time is it where X is? How long Y will be available? Until when Z will be pestering me? Although there are plenty of web sites that give you that information (I particularly like the worldclock from time and date.com), this kind of information is something I want directly available on my desktop, especially when I’m using IRC – our primary mode of instant communication in W3C.

So, using a Gnome desktop, I installed a set of 4 clocks on my desktop set on the timezones of the people I work the most often with… Et voilà !

6 September 2005

New responsibilities

Filed under:

As of this month, my time allocation is moving from half-QA/half-Systems Team to half-Mobile Web Initiative (also known as MWI)/half-Systems Team.

While I have a certain sadness to leave the work on QA after having been involved in it for the past three years, it’s good to leave it with a set of very satisfying results: the Specification Guidelines were published as a W3C Recommendation a few weeks ago, the Working Group – while its charter is not going to be renewed – is on track to continue its most important work items through the Interest Group, after a truly excellent face-to-face meeting in Dublin; among them, work has started on formalizing the group experience on test case metadata which should hopefully be published as a note in the upcoming weeks.

18 August 2005

Could you please remove that needle?

Filed under:

(this was originally posted to a Team-only mailing list; it crosses some of the boundaries I usually reserve to my personal Web site, but I figured now it’s written up in English, I could as well publish it here)

Dear Voodoo Practitioner,

Whoever you are, could you please remove that needle from the doll made to my effigy? Don’t deny it, I know you’ve done it, for some reason.

« Newer entriesOlder entries »

Picture of Dominique Hazael-MassieuxDominique Hazaël-Massieux (dom@w3.org) is part of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Staff; his interests cover a number of Web technologies, as well as the usage of open source software in a distributed work environment.