Don’t call me DOM

28 November 2011

Web APIs vs APIs for Web-based OS

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There is a growing number of operating systems and applications frameworks that are based on, or integrate deeply with Web technologies: Intel & Samsung’s Tizen, HP (formerly Palm) WebOS, Mozilla’s boot2gecko, Windows 8 Metro apps, WAC, Webinos, PhoneGap to name a few.

In particular, most of these projects have JavaScript APIs to interact with features that are not available to browsers due to security and privacy concerns.

27 September 2011

Brower Panel at Paris Web

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(version française ci-dessous)

Two weeks from now, the Paris Web conference, probably the best conference in France about Web craft, will open; at the very end of this conference, I’ll be animating a panel with representative from various browser vendors: Karl Dubost from Opera, Sam Dutton from Google, Paul Rouget from Mozilla, and David Rousset from Microsoft.

The focus of our panel will be to understand how browser vendors combine innovation with interoperability, competition with collaboration.

9 October 2009

Web 2.0 illustrated

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I am by no mean good at making graphics, but I very much like the idea of turning complex ideas into easier-to-grasp graphics.

As I was invited to talk about “Web 2.0” a month ago at the WITFOR conference, I wanted to use a graphic that would illustrate Tim O’Reilly’s definition of Web 2.0 in 7 points.

I started to look for existing illustrations that I could re-use, but while there are many illustrations of what Web 2.0 is in general, I didn’t find any that focused on Tim’s “official” definition; since a big part of the message I wanted to convey was that Web 2.0 was not (only) a buzzword but was actually a fairly well-defined concept, I couldn’t just re-use any of these vague illustrations.

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Picture of Dominique Hazael-MassieuxDominique Hazaël-Massieux (dom@w3.org) is part of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Staff; his interests cover a number of Web technologies, as well as the usage of open source software in a distributed work environment.